The films feature three inspiring photographers who have unique stories to tell, and have been through moving experiences.

The experiences cover a wide range of topical issues including mental health, terminal illness conflict, and recovery which I thought might be of interest to you:

More Than an Image

More than an Image

More than an Image | Wex Photo

​1) Giles Duley is a documentary photographer who lost three limbs when treading on an IED in Afghanistan. He uses photography to highlight the plight of the world’s most vulnerable people and has helped raise enough money to change the lives of one family of Syrian refugees.

2) Daniel Regan turned to photography as a means of addressing his mental health condition after two suicide attempts. He demonstrates how photography can give a voice to those who feel they have no words.

3) Hannah Laycock is a fine-art photographer who uses photography to explore and raise awareness of her multiple sclerosis. Through her work she tries to give people a sense of what it might be like to have such an invisible condition, while also using photography as a means of escape from her daily struggles with MS.

The purpose of these videos is to help add to the conversation around the importance of photography and image creation as a whole. If we can encourage people to find or rediscover an art or passion that will help them overcome or get through difficult times, we will achieve a positive campaign.

Photography Saved My Life:

The True Power of Photography

A new series of video interviews with inspirational British photographers has revealed the truly transformative power of photography.

Wex Photographic has uncovered three particularly moving stories that demonstrate how photography can significantly affect a person’s life.

The first narrative follows Giles Duley, a documentary photographer whose work among civilian victims of war in the Middle East led to his own life-changing injury. Despite losing three limbs when treading on an IED in Afghanistan, Giles continues to use photography to highlight the plight of the world’s most vulnerable people and has helped raise enough money to change the lives of one family of Syrian refugees. “If you believe a story is important enough,” says Duley. “You have to find ways to keep telling it.”

The second narrative examines how photography became a coping mechanism for Daniel Regan, whose mental-health issues led to two suicide attempts. While in hospital, Daniel turned to photography as a means of addressing his condition and escaping into another world. This is a moving and emotive story that demonstrates how photography can give a voice to those who feel they have no words.

“It’s really clear that photography has saved my life,” Regan says. “When you are having mental-health difficulties, there are no words available to describe how you feel; art and visual language can help to fill in the gaps where language is missing.”

The subject of the third narrative is Hannah Laycock, a fine-art photographer who uses photography as a way to explore and raise awareness of her multiple sclerosis. Through her work she tries to give people a sense of what it might be like to have such an invisible condition, while also using photography as a means of escape from her daily struggles with MS.

Hannah states: “There isn’t an hour that goes by where I don’t notice my MS, but with photography I’m getting closer to that sensation of forgetting my condition. There’s always that glimmer of hope that there’s going to be a positive out of a negative.”

Alongside the videos and articles, Wex also surveyed their customers to see what photography means to them. In a survey completed by over 750 people, 74 per cent said that photography had changed their life. Elsewhere, 64 per cent said photography was an essential part of their lives; while more than half of respondents associated it with excitement (72%), pride (60%), joy (59%) and wonder (56%).

“The idea behind #MoreThanAnImage is to get to the heart of why photographers do what they do,” says Matt Devine, Head of Content at Wex. “By telling the unique stories of inspirational people, we are exploring the true power of the art form.”